Do you ‘get the memo’ delivered by the actions and example of our Papa?

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image@catholicheraldfacebookpage

The little known encyclical on Marriage that predated Humanae Vitae by almost 40 years

A important document to be aware of. Such an important topic.

Doug Lawrence's Catholic Weblog

casta

When the Anglican church at the Lambeth Conference of 1930 became the first Christian church or sect to break ranks with the 2000 year belief and practice of the Christian Faith regarding contraception, there was massive scandal in religious circles.  

The breech in doctrine was roundly derided even by most other “mainline” liberal protestant sects.  Of course, Pope Pius XI responded with the seminal Casti Connubii, which just absolutely castigated the Anglican position and still is the most comprehensive Magisterial statement on the evils of contraception and the “sex for pleasure” mentality that has ever been released.

All Catholics should read it – the differences between Casti Connubii and Humanae Vitae are stark.

Link to article

Read  Casti Connubii

Read Humanae Vitae

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Trust without wavering

05_40_4Iamthelightoftheworld_web1PSALM 26

From Biblia.com 

A Psalm of David.

1 Vindicate me, O Lord,

for I have walked in my integrity,

and I have trusted in the Lord without wavering.

2 Prove me, O Lord, and try me;

test my heart and my mind.

3 For thy steadfast love is before my eyes,

and I walk in faithfulness to thee.

4 I do not sit with false men,

nor do I consort with dissemblers;

5 I hate the company of evildoers,

and I will not sit with the wicked.

6 I wash my hands in innocence,

and go about thy altar, O Lord,

7 singing aloud a song of thanksgiving,

and telling all thy wondrous deeds.

8 O Lord, I love the habitation of thy house,

and the place where thy glory dwells.

9 Sweep me not away with sinners,

nor my life with bloodthirsty men,

10 men in whose hands are evil devices,

and whose right hands are full of bribes.

11 But as for me, I walk in my integrity;

redeem me, and be gracious to me.

12 My foot stands on level ground;

in the great congregation I will bless the Lord.

Crossing the Bridge

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Who, why… so what?

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  • A niece falls pregnant out-of-wedlock. ‘So what? It was a planned pregnancy, it’s such happy news.’
  • A friend, colleague, son or daughter lives with their partner. ‘So what, what they do in their bedroom has nothing to do with anyone else. It’s their choice. He/she is not my or your responsibility. It’s none of your business!’
  • The stranger on the bus uses profanities and racist slurs against someone on the bus. ‘So? It’s not your problem.’ 
  • Your niece is being emotionally abused by her boyfriend. ‘It’s between her and her partner, and up to her parents to get involved.Why should you get involved.’
  • A colleague has shared that she is considering an abortion. ‘Why?So what…it’s her body, her baby, the time’s not right , she’s too young, she wasn’t in a serious relationship….’
  • A close friend’s child is moving from one ‘serious’ relationship to another in quick succession. These relationships seem to follow the set pattern of:-  moving in together and setting up house, and then very soon, upping sticks and moving on to the next relationship and setting up house in a new neighbourhood. ‘So? What’s your problem? Youth is for living to the full. For experimentation, We only live once! Live every day to the fullest.’
  • A teenager known to you, smokes regularly. His parents don’t know. ‘Let them continue to believe what they believe right now. Don’t rock the boat’. 
  • A young couple comes to visit and decides to stay over until morning. ‘They’re in love, let them be.’
  • Someone mentions that Cameron’s decision to move forward on the legalisation of gay marriage, is the best decision he’s made for some time. ‘Everyone to their own. Everyone has a right to an opinion. It’s the way things are. Who cares? Live and let live.’
  • A ‘catholic’ acquaintance proudly announces that he and his now  wife, moved in together before they married and he has encouraged his children to do the same. ‘Who cares, move with the times’.

As a Catholic Christian I have been challenged by similar scenarios and have done my best to make a moral case in favour of the right choice in each case. As a Christian. 

The more the years go by,and my life experience broadens I feel Exasperated. Deflated. Desperate. Side-lined and Ignored. Dismissed. My Christian witness seems to be in vain. It falls on deaf ears.  My views as a Christian, especially as a Catholic Christian, are just not taken seriously.images (2)

My question to you is: why bother?After sharing a fundamental Truth, it’s seemingly tolerated, heard, and promptly forgotten.

I believe in Jesus. I believe in His plan for the salvation of mankind. I believe in His Life, Death and Resurrection for my sake and yours. It’s fine to profess these beliefs and to discuss these beliefs in the company of my fellow Christians, but is it worth the flack and derision I get when I support the teachings of the Church with my neighbour, when these values are looked upon as outdated, and irrelevant in secular society. Nobody cares.

Really, they don’t.

 

Abortion Proponents Aim to Oust the Holy See from the UN

An important position at the UN for the Vatican that needs your signature in support.

Biltrix

According to a recent report from the Catholic News Agency, “Catholics for Choice” is once again seeking to end the Holy See’s permanent observer status at the United Nations.

Catholics for Choice is an abortion advocacy group that promotes teachings contrary to the Catholic Church. The American Bishops have repeatedly warned that they are “not a Catholic organization.”

On January 16, the abortionist group’s president, John O’Brien, argued

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A fitting ‘BIG society’ award for the St. Vincent de Paul Society:- they turn concern into action.

“For I was hungry and you gave me food; I was thirsty and you gave me drink;

I was a stranger and you welcomed me, naked and you clothed me!

I was ill and you comforted me; in prison and you came to me!”

Matthew 25: 35-36

St Vincent de PaulREAD  at  CHRISTIAN TODAY

David Cameron today recognised the work of the St Vincent de Paul Society (SVP) in the Big Society Awards of 2014.

“The St Vincent de Paul Society turns concern into action,” he said. “The society’s incredible number of volunteers build on a 200-year history of lending a practical hand to support those in need.”

“I’m delighted to recognise all 10,000 St Vincent de Paul volunteers, and the staff who support them to do their vital work, with this Big Society Award.”

Adrian Abel, National President of the SVP, said: “It is so appropriate that this award has come in the bicentenary year of our founder’s birth. The award recognises the work of our 10,000 volunteers who give around one million hours of voluntary service, by befriending people with needs in our community.”

“The SVP provides practical opportunities for people to turn their concern into action, truly a Society with a big heart.”

The SVP is open about being motivated by faith in God.  It primarily works to support the lonely and people in need of practical assistance, and its giving includes befriending and providing food parcels, clothes and furniture.

In 2013, SVP volunteers made over half a million visits to nearly 90,000 individuals and families across England and Wales.

Those helped included the housebound, older people, hospital patients, those in residential care homes, travellers, the homeless, refugees and people with mental health disorders.

They also co-ordinate school and university volunteer groups, provide debt advice, and run over 40 shops in economically disadvantaged areas.

One volunteer gave an example of their work.

“We arrived, half an hour after our usual visiting time, rang the bell and waited. After a few minutes, Mr Mercer, frail and in his late eighties, opened the door,” they explained.

“I thought he looked rather upset and I was afraid we were interrupting something. Then, to my surprise, Mr Mercer leaned his forehead against the wall of the hall and with his shoulders shaking he started to sob quietly.

“I could hear the TV somewhere and I didn’t know what to do. I said ‘are you alright Mr Mercer?’ He replied ‘Yes, yes. I just thought that no-one was going to come to see me tonight.’

“Our visit may be the only contact someone has had with another person since the previous week. We may feel we don’t do much during a visit, but this is an extraordinary testimony to how much it is appreciated.”

Fitting recognition for a Society who work tirelessly for the benefit of the marginalised, forgotten and downtrodden. Fitting too as the feast day for  St. Vincent de Paul is 22nd of January.

stvincent

Saint Vincent De Paul Society provides clothing, food, household goods, transportation, and utility emergency assistance to the poor and needy in the community.regardless of religion, race, or nationality

  • Do you support the SVP Society at your parish? You may be doing so without even knowing that you are.
  • Do you know which causes the SVP is supporting?
  • Do you know anyone on the SVP committee at your parish? If not , make it your job to find out.

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A Succinct Defense of Marriage

Listen! listen! Listen! Excellent defence of Marriage.

matt fradd

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This is perhaps the best, succinct argument for marriage that I’ve heard.

I encourage you to watch it several times and then share it with friends.

It was offered by Ryan Anderson to the Indiana House Judiciary Committee earlier this week. Anderson is the co-author of the book, What Is Marriage? Man and Woman: A Defense. One of the other co-authors, Sherif Girgis, is a regular guest on Catholic Answers Live. You can (and should) listen to one of his shows here.

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If you don’t fit in, you’re probably doing the right thing.

IMAGE@IGNATIUSPRESS

IMAGE@IGNATIUSPRESS

Over at Along the Watch Tower,  Chalcedon’s post speaks loudly of the sad reality that engulfs youth of today: not having confidence or language to talk about religion or faith. He writes, ‘Religion is to this generation what sex was to some previous ones ; something which embarrasses students because they do not know much about it, what they know makes it seem difficult, and they do not have a language in which to discuss it. He compares it to generations past who felt the same way about discussing sex.’ 

How the pendulum swings…

I believe this dilemma not only afflicts the youth but society in general:- what the youth do well is to reflect the society in which they live. Many Europeans are “unchurched,” meaning they have never step foot in a church for any reason besides weddings, funerals, or Baptisms. They have never gone to a church service once their entire life. So, how could they talk about religion?

I place this dilemma squarely at the feet of the assiduous and determined acceptance of secular values by Western governments. All this in the name of progress:- through modernization and relativism, systematically removing religious authority/ influence in all aspects of life and governance.

As a direct result of secularisation Christianity is marginalised. As a result of individualistic religion , a century of war and disregard for religion and faith matters the appreciation and understanding of religion or faith has declined. Many Europeans still identify themselves a Christian, but do not actively attend Christian services. We need also to keep in mind, that as a former continent known as “Christendom”, Europe is experiencing a rapid change in religious diversity. The two fastest growing religions in Europe are secularism (no religious affiliation, agnosticism, atheism, etc.) and Islam. I believe that secularism has completely won over European culture replacing Christianity as Europe’s world-view.

I use excerpts of an article from The Catholic News Society to substantiate my feelings about our Christian responsibility to live as Christ’s disciples as a way of life and as examples to those around us. :- (Emphasis my own)

Sharing an obligation to spread the good news of salvation in Christ, all Christian communities are challenged by the fact that many people today do not think they need God, Pope Benedict XVI said.
“The spiritual poverty of many of our contemporaries, who no longer perceive the absence of God in their lives as a privation, represents a challenge for all Christians,” the pope said Nov. 15 in a meeting with members of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity.

Pope Benedict said authentic ecumenical prayer, dialogue and cooperation cannot ignore “the crisis of faith that vast regions of the planet are experiencing,” nor can Christians ignore signs that many modern people still feel a need for some kind of spirituality.
Efforts to reunite all Christians are an essential part of the new evangelization, the pope said. Responding to the obligation to share the Gospel and to heal a divided Christianity, he said, every Christian must “return to the essential, to the heart of our faith, giving the world a witness of the living God, that is, a God who knows us and loves us and in whose gaze we live; a God who awaits the response of our love in our everyday lives.”….

...What is at stake, he said, is the credibility of Christianity as a whole and its ability to speak to modern men and women and to influence the way they live and act.

The archbishop said while secularization places challenges before the church, the real danger is “the secularization of the church” itself, which begins very concretely with church members living and acting as if they aren’t church members.

This means that Christians living in a secularised society will face many a challenge when having to share Truths about ethical questions, particularly regarding the safeguarding of human life from conception to death, family and marriage.

CCC 31 Created in God’s image and called to know and love him, the person who seeks God discovers certain ways of coming to know him. These are also called proofs for the existence of God, not in the sense of proofs in the natural sciences, but rather in the sense of “converging and convincing arguments”, which allow us to attain certainty about the truth. These “ways” of approaching God from creation have a twofold point of departure: the physical world, and the human person.

Not until the Baptism of the Lord!..and then Spiritually until Candlemas.

imgae@

imgae@orthodoxcatholicism.com

Christmas does not  begin in October,November or in December but at Midnight Mass on the 24th of December. So when does Christmastide come to an end then? Judging by some reactions, pretty much 3 days after Christmas, when all the decorations are put back in the loft and ‘duties’ around Christmas festivities are over. Sadly though this is not the case at all.

Christmas falls on 25th December. We mark the birthday of Jesus of Nazareth. Church and ancient custom then add a twelve-day follow-up season up to Epiphany, which in 2014 was celebrated on 5th January. However, liturgically speaking, the season of Christmastide lasts until the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord (today ,12th January) and “Ordinary Time” does not commence until after this day. In some traditions, Christmas further continues until the feast of the Presentation of the Lord in the Temple  (Candlemas) on 2nd February . 

Simeon takes Jesus in his arms and praises God: “Master, now you are dismissing your servant in peace, according to your word; for my eyes have seen your salvation...

Simeon takes Jesus in his arms and praises God: “Master, now you are dismissing your servant in peace, according to your word; for my eyes have seen your salvation…

The entire Christmas Cycle is a crescendo of Christ’s manifesting Himself as God and King — to the shepherds, to the Magi, at His Baptism, to Simeon and the prophetess, Anna (Luke 2).  

The days from the Feast of the Nativity to the Epiphany are known as “The Twelve Days of Christmas,” with Christmas itself being the first day, and Twelfth Night — 5 January — being the last of the twelve days. Christmastide liturgically ends on 13 January, the Octave of the Epiphany and the Baptism of Christ. But Christmas doesn’t end spiritually — i.e., the celebration of the events of Christ’s life as a child don’t end, and the great Christmas Cycle doesn’t end — until Candlemas on 2 February.

candlemas1

The Presentation

In this way, just as From Ash Wednesday on, we commemorate Christ in the desert for forty days, and just as after Easter we celebrate for forty days until the Ascension, after Christmas we celebrate the Child Jesus for forty days — all through the season of Time After Epiphany — until Candlemas.

The delineation of those Christ Child celebrations looks like this:

  • Christmas
    Christ is born
  • Feast of the Holy Innocents
    Herod slaughters the baby boys in order to kill the Christ Child
  • The Circumcision (the Octave of Christmas)
    Jesus follows the Law
  • Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus
    After He is circumcised, He is named and becomes a part of the Holy Family
  • Twelfth Night 
    The Twelve Days of Christmas as a Feast come to an end
  • Feast of the Epiphany
    Jesus reveals His divinity to the three Magi, and during His Baptism, and at the wedding at Cana
  • Baptism of Our Lord/Octave of the Epiphany
    Christmas liturgically ends with the Octave of the Epiphany.
  • Feast of the Holy Family
    Jesus condescends to be subject to His parents
  • Feast of the Purification (Candlemas)
    40 days after giving birth, Mary goes to the Temple to be purified and to “redeem” Jesus per the Old Testament Law of the firstborn. Christmas truly ends as a Season with Candlemas.

Let friends and family know about this and continue to celebrate the Nativity of our  Lord and Saviour until the 2nd of February.